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Veloflex tubulars

Veloflex tubulars

Postby Adrien » Sun Jan 21, 2007 3:00 pm

Hi guys,

I received this week a batch of Veloflex tubulars. The Carbon, Service Course and Record.
That's whay I create the topic, I'd like to let you know how they will perform once I'll install them as soon as the weather is nice again.


Image

First of all, here are the weights in grams:

Rercord: 185 184
Service Course: 217 217 217 212 212
Carbon: 258 278 278 276

The treads:

Image
Carbon, Service course, Record

The Service course and the Record are 20mm wide while the Carbon is 22mm.
Claimed weights are 180gr for the Record so it seems true from the 2 I got. The Service course is said to be 210gr, the weight is ok too. The only tubular that is pretty far from the claimed weight is the Carbon with 20-40gr heavier.

Will be updated.
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Postby VENTOUX » Mon Jan 22, 2007 2:09 am

I like the look of the records, what is the difference in treads, what differences do they make?
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Postby alienator » Mon Jan 22, 2007 4:07 am

VENTOUX wrote:I like the look of the records, what is the difference in treads, what differences do they make?


On skinny road bike tires, tread makes no difference. A slick tire and patterned tread tire of the same compound and same dimensions will perform the same in the wet. FWIW, road bikes don't hydroplane. To hydroplane you have to go somewhere in the range of 80-100mph to build up enough wedge pressure in the water to lift the tires off the ground.
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Postby VENTOUX » Mon Jan 22, 2007 5:00 am

Interesting, then what the heck are these different treads for, and which ones do you chose, the ones that just look the coolest to you?
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Postby alienator » Mon Jan 22, 2007 5:20 am

VENTOUX wrote:Interesting, then what the heck are these different treads for, and which ones do you chose, the ones that just look the coolest to you?


Fashion? Maybe also because people are used to seeing grooved or patterned tread on car and motorcycle tires. A lot of people don't really understand how tires work. When I was racing motorcycles the occasional person would ask why I used slicks..."aren't they slippery?"
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Postby Warblade » Wed Feb 07, 2007 10:01 pm

alienator wrote:Fashion? Maybe also because people are used to seeing grooved or patterned tread on car and motorcycle tires. A lot of people don't really understand how tires work. When I was racing motorcycles the occasional person would ask why I used slicks..."aren't they slippery?"


That's funny! It's actually quite the contrary for slicks. They're incredibly sticky. I was at the International Motorcycle in Seattle in December and Metzler had a display there. Their slicks are amazingly slicky.
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Postby estone2 » Wed Feb 07, 2007 10:53 pm

Warblade wrote:
alienator wrote:Fashion? Maybe also because people are used to seeing grooved or patterned tread on car and motorcycle tires. A lot of people don't really understand how tires work. When I was racing motorcycles the occasional person would ask why I used slicks..."aren't they slippery?"


That's funny! It's actually quite the contrary for slicks. They're incredibly sticky. I was at the International Motorcycle in Seattle in December and Metzler had a display there. Their slicks are amazingly slicky.

Kinda true for bike tires, too.
Feeling a new Conti or Michellin they're definitely not slippery.
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Postby alienator » Wed Feb 07, 2007 11:55 pm

Warblade wrote:That's funny! It's actually quite the contrary for slicks. They're incredibly sticky. I was at the International Motorcycle in Seattle in December and Metzler had a display there. Their slicks are amazingly slicky.


When the slicks are up to temp, they're sticky, but until they get up to operating temp, they can be, uhm, "fun." I watched a "pro" wad a Fast By Ferracci Ducati superbike on his first lap on the bike--this was a $50-100,000 bike--when he entered the first corner of that first lap--an 80ish mph right hander--and wadded the thing up. Tires no sticky on that first lap.

Racing in the rain is also a bit "challenging" on motorcycle slicks. It's the sort of thing that really makes you want to believe in God.
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Postby Fibre-Lyte » Wed Feb 07, 2007 11:55 pm

Warblade wrote:
alienator wrote:Fashion? Maybe also because people are used to seeing grooved or patterned tread on car and motorcycle tires. A lot of people don't really understand how tires work. When I was racing motorcycles the occasional person would ask why I used slicks..."aren't they slippery?"


That's funny! It's actually quite the contrary for slicks. They're incredibly sticky. I was at the International Motorcycle in Seattle in December and Metzler had a display there. Their slicks are amazingly slicky.


I'm not sure exactly how cycle tyres work, but bear in mind that motorcycle slicks are incredibly sticky in the dry (mainly due to the compounds), but the minute you get water on the track, they're virtually useless :wink:
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Postby fdegrove » Tue Feb 13, 2007 6:28 am

Fibre-Lyte wrote:
Warblade wrote:
alienator wrote:Fashion? Maybe also because people are used to seeing grooved or patterned tread on car and motorcycle tires. A lot of people don't really understand how tires work. When I was racing motorcycles the occasional person would ask why I used slicks..."aren't they slippery?"


That's funny! It's actually quite the contrary for slicks. They're incredibly sticky. I was at the International Motorcycle in Seattle in December and Metzler had a display there. Their slicks are amazingly slicky.


I'm not sure exactly how cycle tyres work, but bear in mind that motorcycle slicks are incredibly sticky in the dry (mainly due to the compounds), but the minute you get water on the track, they're virtually useless :wink:


Hi,

Yep. OTOH, as Alienator correctly explained, bicycle tyres have a much smaller foorprint and run at much lower speed.
Personally I love slick tubulars and wish there were more of them.
Whether a tyre adheres well under wet conditions will depend mostly on the composition of the compound IMHO.

Now, for the Veloflex tubbies, I've ridden a couple of seasons on most of them bar the Criterium, mostly because on paper these are heavier and I'd wanted an all black set as these were, dare I say it, my everyday tubbies.

While the Carbon is probably one of the best if not the best in it's category, the SC and Record are a whole league beyond.
They are however more prone to puncture than the Carbon but all of them are very easy to repair.

The best combo seems to me a Record on the FW and a SC on the rear. It's simply lighter and the FW is the only place where the Record is going to be worth it's salt unless of course you'd rather put it aside for special occasions.

Similar in riding qualities are the top Gommitalia (Platinum) and some of the Deda Tre even though the latter are noticeably heavier.

Once you've been totally spoiled by the Veloflex everything else seems to ride like a pair of old socks. That's of course disregarding the Dugast tubbies of which the silk ones are really in a class of their own.

New on the market are FWB, an ex Dugast employee making the same range as carried by Dugast and operating from France.
I haven't tried any of them but maybe Adrien has.

Looking forward to hear if Adrien's findings will coincide with my own. Always reassuring....

Oh, one last note. The Veloflex Carbon now claims a pressure range from 7 to 10 bar, which may have something to do with the increased weight as all my older ones where much closer to the claimed 240g.
If that's so, I wish they would have kept things the way they were before, 8 bar seemed smack in the middle of the comfort zone for that model to me......

Ciao, :wink:
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Postby ookii » Wed Apr 25, 2007 7:32 pm

Adrien,
any updates?
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Re: Veloflex tubulars

Postby Prasad86 » Tue Jan 17, 2012 11:54 am

Hey I want to install them but latest one any suggestion for it.
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Re: Veloflex tubulars

Postby Fuchs » Tue Jan 17, 2012 2:25 pm

i just love all veloflex tires. especially the once with the brown sides :)

i think they perform really well and hold quite long. only problem i got is that the servizio corse tire are not made any longer and i just loved this one. of course thera is a new version but it is wider with 22mm and a bit heavyer. but as an every day tire it is perfect!
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