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Victoria, my Cervelo SLC-SL

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • #93689
    Participant

    Many years in the making, with numerous iterations, this is my mistress Victoria.

    Frameset: Cervelo SLC-SL (including drillium for Di2 internal wiring)
    Derailleurs: Shimano Di2
    Brakes: Hooker Aero SL
    Brakes Levers: Campagnolo Record 10s
    Brake Cables: Nokon
    Bottom Bracket: Phil Wood Ti
    Cranks: SRM Science with Fibre-Lyte carbon chainrings (52/38)
    Wheels: Hed Jet 6
    Skewers: KCNC
    Tires: Conti 4000s GP
    Saddle: Tune Kom-Vor
    Stem: 3T ARX-Pro w/ ti bolts
    Handlebar: Zipp SLC2

    Here’s another view:

    When she’s in a frisky and in the mood to time trial, I switch out her front end and we look like this:

    One special touch on this bike is that I am using a prototype “brain” for the Di2, which hides nicely in the stem as seen (or not seen) here:


    This gives me sequential shifting so that I don’t ever need to manually shift the front derailleur. When I shift the rear derailleur to a certain gear it will shift the front derailleur for me and at the same time shift the rear derailleur 2 cogs in the opposite direction. It’s really the greatest thing ever. Better than going from friction shifting to indexed shifting. Better than going from indexed to STI or Ergopower. And better than that to electric shifting. It really is all that and a bag of chips. I was somehow lucky enough to get one of the prototypes. The only downside is that it’s a huge drain on battery life. My custom battery (in the seatpost) has about 25% more capacity than the stock Di2 battery, but I would be lucky to get 15 hours of ride time out of it. I don’t ride all that much though, so I just charge it every other week.

    So this is Victoria. My mistress. The one who takes my time away from my wife.

    Have you ever wondered if there was more to life, other than being really, really, ridiculously good looking?
    #93798
    Participant

    Can you talk about the carbon repair?

    #93930
    Participant

    So just over a year ago I crashed and put a small crash in the drive side seat stay. It wasn’t too bad – about 2 inches long and bare’t noticable. It was actually along the seam of the carbon tube. Luckily I have a friend with a lot of carbon fiber experience, so after purchasing the 2-part epoxy I loaded up and drove for 4 hours to his house to do the repair.

    The first step was to sand the clear coat off all the way around the tube extending over an inch past the repair area.

    Then, with the disc attachment on a dremel I then opened up the crack a bit to ensure that the epoxy would penetrate the area. A sheet of carbon fiber was then cut to the length of the tube that I prepared and to a width so that it would wrap the tube 1-1/2 times. This sheet was then “painted” with the epoxy using a paint brush but ensuring that the epoxy was pushed in between all of the cross fibers of the cloth. The cloth was then wrapped around the tube, then a bit more epoxy was painted on. At this point I had to wrap the repair with this shrink tape starting at the bottom of the tube so that it wound around it and ended at the top. The top and bottom of this tape was taped into place with packing tape. Finally, I used an industrial heat gun to heat up the tape on all sides of the tube so that it shrunk tight. Some epoxy dripped out the bottom and once it was all tight and the epoxy stopped flowing it was time to wait for it to cure. I waited about 16 hours. Here it is with the tape still on it before I took it off.

    Then I unwrapped the tape and saw this:

    At that point I had to sand it to get everything smooth and then spray it with clear coat. Done. It was suggested that I paint the repair area black and then clear coat it and then nobody would be able to tell that it was ever repaired, but I like the look of it.

    Have you ever wondered if there was more to life, other than being really, really, ridiculously good looking?
    #93936
    Participant

    Nice one, they are a great looking frame! I used to really enjoy racing mine.

    #93937
    Participant

    That’s a perdy bike Mat! What did you replace it with?

    Have you ever wondered if there was more to life, other than being really, really, ridiculously good looking?
    #93940
    Participant

    Pritchet,

    I went with a Colnago C59 as my main bike and haven’t looked back. The SLC-SL looks better, but (for me) the C59 rides better.

    That’s a perdy bike Mat! What did you replace it with?

    #94063
    Participant

    New 52t chainring for Victoria. The previous carbon ring lasted me about 18 months, but it was time for a new one.

    Have you ever wondered if there was more to life, other than being really, really, ridiculously good looking?
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

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