Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Custom Bikes’ Category

Geoff McFetridge Light Bike

April 8th, 2010

Emiliano Jordan

03

Light bikes don’t have to be boring, as aptly stated during the “light bike” project discussion. An anonymous individual set the tone, with “it would be exciting to do a design that isn’t in the Darth Vador, Deathstar aesthetic”. We were excited at the prospect of working with artist Geoff Mcfetridge to create a design outside what is often a stealthy conservative look.

For the “light-bike” Mcfetridge designed a variety of abstract iconic imagery exploring a narrative of the psychological turmoil encountered while pedaling along our favorite pastime. Read more

Custom Parlee Z1

April 8th, 2010

Emiliano Jordan

custom_painted_parlee_bike_01

Sometimes it’s in the everyday conversation with our customers over the turns of wrenches from which the best Ideas are born. You know the saying “It’s the Cadillac of bikes?” Well for us, Cadillac doesn’t always fit; they have style and quality, but they tend to be big and slow and eat up a lot of gas. We prefer Lamborghini – light, fast, flashy; a car that is often more of a racer than it’s driver, built for careening around switchbacks in the Italian Alps.

With this in mind, we decided to make a Parlee that had everything a true bike aficionado could fall in love with, and more – a bike that would never leave you wanting. We happen to have a customer who was looking for just such a bike and he gave us Carte blanche to let our imaginations run. So, in the summer of 2008 we teamed up with Bob Parlee and Dave Sem to show not that the Parlee is the Lamborghini of bikes, but that Lamborghini is the Parlee of Cars. With Parlee beginning to distinguish themselves from the rest of the high-end road bike market, why not? Read more

Cory Rosene Stainless Steel Cyclocross Bike

April 8th, 2010

Emiliano Jordan

cory_rosene_025

Cory Rosene is new to the bike building world, having apprenticed under David Bohm for the last 2 years. Rosene has honed his skills for his Interbike debut, with a stainless steel cyclocross bike. Not only this Rosene’s first foray in to building with Reynolds 953 stainless steel, it is also his first cross frame.

Rosene designed this bike to be raced, utilizing stout chain-chain stays to add additional stiffness. Like many steel bikes, Rosene utilized beautifully crafted lugs, but unlike many cross frames, the bottom bracket is also lugged. This was an important consideration for his design, which uses a combination of bead-blasted and polished surfaces passing through a green skeleton. This emphasizes the lugged construction of the bike, blending modern materials with classic aesthetics in a seamless vision of performance and beauty.
Read more

Bohemian Stainless Steel

April 8th, 2010

Emiliano Jordan

custom_bohemian_stainless_steel_bicycle_19

Since 1994, David Bohm has earned a reputation for creating some of the most beautiful, custom steel bicycle frames in the world. Cyclists seek him looking for a unique, exquisitely crafted bicycle that they’ll be proud to own and love to ride.

In collaboration with Fairwheel Bikes and KVA David Bohm has created a road frame, utilizing KVA’s new stainless steel tubeset. The weight of the frame came in slightly over 3lbs, with the complete bike weighing just 13.5lbs – one of the lightest steel builds we’ve seen.

Bohm’s design contains keen aesthetic themes such as Art Deco inspired lugs, Egyptian influenced color, and unique materials not generally seen in frame construction. Palladium Leaf, Gold, Mother of Pearl and shell inlay, as well as raw Silver are just some of the exotic adornments making this bike a one of a kind creation.
Read more

M2Racer Light Bike

April 8th, 2010

Emiliano Jordan

lightest_bicycle_ghisallo_01

Our first true breakthrough in custom bike builds — The world’s lightest bicycle. This bike is so many things for us: it is the foundation upon which much of our current success is built; it culminates the experience of creating, designing and being a part of a world’s first. We have built the first bike to go below the 8.0 pound mark. We were told to build the lightest bike and we responded by breaking through the previous industry standard. This project is a custom build using parts from the now defunct company M2 Racer, a lightweight bicycle component manufacturer. The core of the bike is the Litespeed Ghisallo. Although this frame went on to become the lightest production bike on the market, we wanted to go further and make it even lighter. To show them how we could take their product to the next level, a level only made necessary by our desire to push the industry to even greater heights towards perfection, we convinced them to give us one of their prototypes, a frame that had not had the extra bits of material added to account for manufacturing tolerances.

From there, it was time to roll up our sleeves and get to work selecting the best combination of parts that would bring our goal into fruition. A bike can only be bought down to a certain level of lightness. To go even further takes time, education, experimentation and customization. We began with some obvious customization: pulling apart the derailleurs, replacing stock springs with wrapped Ti rods, manually removing excess materials in the brake levers, cranks and dérailleurs. Next, we convinced Zero Gravity to send us a prototype brake-set made out of aluminum, a set so light it never made it to production due to costs. We then went to the Carbon Fiber lab at the University of Arizona to create a one-off carbon fiber cassette, mating it with M2 Racer’s already lightweight componentry.
Read more

Lightweight Sram Red Debut Bike

April 8th, 2010

Emiliano Jordan

light_bike_sram_red_debut_05

Early 2005, a quiet murmur began to spread through the cycling industry. Word had begun circulating that a SRAM intended to re-write the book on integrated shifting, but would it happen? Could it happen? How would they go toe to toe with the giants that had dominated the road group market for so many years?

By 2006, when SRAM announced the unveiling of their new road groupo, the murmur had grown to a roar. SRAM was already well respected for their mountain bike components, having started their company with grip shift in 1988. If they could bring the same level of functionality, durability, weight, and ergonomics to the road, Shimano and Campagnolo might have to look out.

Of course now this is old news. Today, SRAM is a major player in the road market, a maker of trusted and reliable road components, but at the time of their release everyone was reading the pre-release reviews with rapt attention. Shimano and Campagnolo had years of experience under their belts; grouppos has been time-tested and tweaked over generations. Could this relative newcomer really introduce a whole new design with any success? Could it compete or even compare? Reviewers highlighted the ergonomics; the shifting action was revolutionary and it seemed that SRAM was making good on it’s claim: a radical new take on drive-train, shifters, and brakes. The new technology was quickly embraced by the industry and took its place among the “big-boys” of road.
Read more

14lb Rue Light Mountain Bike

April 7th, 2010

Emiliano Jordan

ruegamer_light_mountain_bike_01

Fairwheel is known for its high-end road bikes and its lightweight parts. This fact is known. One part of the cycling experience easily overlooked is the mountain bike. It must be understood that we are a bike shop for all types of riders, and our experience would not be complete if our employees did not love to ride mountain bikes. In fact, there is just as much Stan’s tire sealant in the shop as tubular glue. Along with our Gucci road mechanic’s bench we also have Dane in the back, working at his custom built suspension work station. In fact, as Interbike 2009 approaches we are getting more and more excited about a project that is going to push the boundaries of mountain bikes by bringing a new road bike breakthrough to the knobby enthusiasts.

In 2008, we decided that a mountain bike needed to share the stage with the road bikes. It was time to bring the dark horse out of the closet so to speak. Yet again, we looked two hours north to Phoenix, Arizona and talked to Ruegamer. The parts list however was not so easily decided. There were a few roads we could take. But, as we all know, our reputation is in introducing parts to the market that catch the eye for their minimal yet functional designs. With this in mind we called upon our flare for the exotic and the light. We imported a handmade suspension fork not available in the US and considering only a few are made a year we were lucky to get one of these 1,000 gram beauties. The wheel set needed to match, so we utilized Edge rims, Extralite hubs and Pillar Ti spokes to build up a 1,150 gram wheelset. After these two components were added to the frame, the rest of the parts list flowed into the project. We then, of course, brought our bike to Interbike and had fun showing off our ingenious design. It is nice to know that we can bring the same concepts to mountain bikes that we do to road bikes.
Read more

Parlee Z-Proto, Dave Sem Paint

April 7th, 2010

Emiliano Jordan

parlee_custom_10

This is the stuff that bike geeks like us drool over – a build that is custom, lightweight, detailed in all regards and red. First, Bob Parlee offered us his new proto-type frame, giving life to revolutionary ideas not yet in production, including integrated seat post, a custom carbon layup, and an all-new seat stay design. This frame features a proto-type mono seat stay that and is the first to feature an integrated bottom bracket, now standard on the Z1.

You will notice in the photos that no detail was left to chance. We worked closely with Parlee and world-class painter Dave Sem to ensure that the custom carbon layup was carefully planned in tandem with painted details and the result is spectacular. Sem took this opportunity to show just what he is capable of, spending over fifty hours covering every inch of tubing, stem, and fork, and… with details both bold and subtle. It’s one of the few bikes that you keep coming back to – and every time, it has something new to show you.

We’d like to think the frame alone is a showstopper, but in the spirit of giving you something new everytime you look closer we went further. We spent hours discussing, dreaming, and arguing about what the build list should include. When the dust settled, we had come up with a list that can do the bike justice. It includes THM Clavicula cranks, Campagnolo Record from stem to stern, and the cherry on top: the wheels. These aren’t just any wheels; a set of Lightweight Ventoux, and not just any set of Ventoux, The first set – serial number “1″, signed by German fastman Erik Zabel. That’s right the hardest working man in cycling, the friendly German hard man, signed our wheels. Enough Said!
Read more